Medication as a Way of Life

I understand that there are a lot of people out there who suffer varying degrees of pain, whether it be in the form of anxiety, depression, or self-esteem. I like to remind people that we need to feel our pain and that medication is not always the thing that will get us through our problems. Yes, in the short term it may cover over the pain, but what happens when the medication wears off? Are we to quickly accept the idea of a lifetime of prescription refills?

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Obviously, our medical options and medicines are essential and they save lives every day, but on the other hand, we are made to feel and experience pain. We are built to overcome. We are made to learn and discover who we are and pain is part of that process.  I won’t even try to comprehend or connect the multitude of dots that correspond with the miseries associated with mixing medication and the side effects and abuses that meds take on the human body. It’s bad–and as miraculous as our bodies are, it can’t fight a battle where our medications are literally tricking it into behaving abnormally, creating feelings of loneliness and even suicide.

I am not a medical doctor and have no authority when it comes to prescription medicines, but I’ve noticed something disturbing when sometimes talking with clients and even friends and that is that I often feel like I’m not actually talking with the person, but with the side effects of medication.

The issue of prescription drug abuse/use and the alarming manner in which they are prescribed is disturbing to me, particularly because everything I write about, all of the exercises and manner in which I try to nudge people into taking charge of their lives is pointless if we are deadened by meds. We simply can’t discover our true selves and our true nature when our emotions and thoughts are clouded over by the effects of being overly medicated.

My suggestion is to get a second opinion and think twice about whether you think you can or cannot overcome a ‘problem’ in your life through medication. Consider holistic approaches, acupuncture, meditation, or even hypnosis. I’m don’t have kids, but I know I would try other options before setting them on a lifelong path of medicating, particularly where meds are presented as the only solution to problems that are common to every day life.

Just today in a grocery store, a voice on the loudspeaker used fear mongering to pressure shoppers into getting TWO ‘Free’ flu shots because it’s the ‘season’ and pneumonia, well…you might get it.  Is it really the ‘season’? If so, why were we pushed to get flu shots all summer long? Is anything ever really ‘free’? The fear, paranoia, and pressure blinds us to how we even really feel.  Stop, listen to yourself. Sometimes you are the real professional when it comes to yourself.

If you’d like to hear more of my thoughts and how to escape the programming and conditioning we live under, my book Toxic Rainbows is available on Amazon.

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What We Can Learn From Limahl

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This just goes to show that you never know where you might find words of wisdom and powerful things to reflect on that will help your spiritual growth and transformation. It never occurred to me to turn to 80s pop star Limahl of Kajagoogoo to contemplate one of the problems crippling so many people today–prescription drug use.

Prescribing meds to ‘fix’ our problems is a pet peeve of mine, particularly since we have seen them prescribed more frequently and at younger and younger ages. It’s disturbing to think that being on meds has become as normal as taking Vitamin C.  It’s become a rite of passage and parents seem not to hesitate in starting their kids on a lifetime of pain and suffering caused by meds that inhibit the body’s natural functions.

They dull our senses, they debilitate our ability to think and reason and every single one of them provide a host of side effects that we didn’t have before we started taking the meds to begin with.

In the song Too Shy, Limahl sings,

Modern medicine falls short of your complaints, try a little harder.
Moving in circles, won’t you dilate. Ooh, Baby try.

In these lyrics Limahl teaches us that we are a bunch of whiney babies and that prescription drugs will never solve our problems. We need to try harder.

He continues by telling us that we are not learning from our problems, only going in circles as if one foot is nailed to the floor. We need to expand our thinking and reach deeper, not obscure our ability to think by the use of meds. Then he says “Ooh, Baby try.” So you know he’s sincere.

Just a bit of levity here, but it’s not that I don’t believe it or think it’s a good message. Thanks, Limahl!

[Disclaimer and urge you to consult a doctor or get a second opinion before you decide to get off your meds or before you start to take them. Give your body a fighting chance, there are enough zombies in this world.]

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